One of my favorite mantras is “don’t talk about it; be about it.” I have been that way since I was a child. I mean seriously, what is the point of you telling me you’re going to do something? I’d much rather you show me than tell me. As it’s said, the proof is in the pudding and I think that means that you find out by seeing, eating and experiencing the pudding, right?

So at the end of the day, regardless of whether you’re an entrepreneur or a corporate business leader, instead of talking about what you are going to do, you have to position yourself to do it. And the way you do that is by taking consistent action. Period. End of story. After all, implementation is what separates leaders from losers. Sorry, I feel like that may have been a little harsh :-(, but I need to drive the point home.

And that is why getting Noah’s question was timely for me:

“Hi Darnyelle. I work in Corporate America as a business analyst. I recently got a hold of your Incredible Factor Brand Acceleration System and I am hooked, I am trying new strategies left and right to position myself differently within my organization. I’ve been itching in my position and I am wanting to take on more responsibility. How do I let my boss know I want more responsibility?”

Check out my response to Noah’s question in this week’s episode of Incredible Factor TV.

As you may know, I have an entire body of work that I offer to corporations through my company’s Amethyst Consulting Group division. Through this division, I help business leaders develop, align and deliver a strong personal brand that advances organizations through training and development and executive coaching.

But, because a personal brand is a leadership requirement, regardless of if you work for yourself or someone else, there are a few distinct things you can do to accelerate your results:

1. Have a clear vision followed by a written plan. When you have a clear vision and a strategic plan to accomplish something, you become much more likely to accomplish it and accelerate your results as a mere byproduct. Remember the Harvard goal study of 1979? 3% had clearly written goals and they were earning ten times as much as the other 97% combined. By taking the time to write your plan down, you automatically accelerate your success. Remember, what gets attended to gets done. I love to make this real when I’m speaking by reducing this down to a good ole trip to the grocery store. As you know (if you’re honest with yourself,) all hell breaks loose when you go to the store without a written list. You buy everything and nothing that you went to the store for. And for those of you who think it’s okay to have your plan in your head, let’s face it – with 60,000 thoughts a day, that plan is as good as gone. I also recommend that you review this plan at least on a quarterly basis. And, let me be clear. Your plan should be a living, breathing document that you review, add to and adjust as you begin to work through the action items to achieve it.

2. Don’t ask for permission; take action. An Inc.com article reveals the results of a survey where executives were asked what is the best way for an employee to get ahead on their careers, and 82% of the respondents said, take on more responsibility. The skills to identify challenges are the same regardless of whether you work for yourself or someone else, right? So, if you identify a problem you could run and tell your boss, or if like Noah you are “itching” for more responsibility, you could create a strategic response to the problem that includes a solution and present it to your boss. Which do you think will go farther? In working with an executive coaching client who was a mid-level manager in his organization, we identified that he often waited to get buy in from his managing director before starting a new project and that was why he’d been overlooked for a few opportunities within the organization. Part of the reason he came to coach with me was so that he could figure out what he wasn’t doing, so that he’d finally appear more visibly within his organization. As an intensive coaching session revealed, he was afraid to share his ideas. I challenged him to do the very thing he was afraid of and as a result, he found himself the lead on a project that in 6 months turned into a promotion in the area of the company where he’d always wanted to work. When I asked him what changed, he responded, “You know Darnyelle, for once I didn’t ask permission, I just took action.”

3. Validate and document results. After you take the necessary action, be sure to get AND document results. And, the reason documentation is necessary is because documenting the results demonstrates how your initiative provided a solution to a problem. Regardless of whether you’re in a position or running a business, solving problems is a good thing. I’m sure you’ve heard me share about the Universal Law of Business before, right? Finding people who have a problem that are actively looking for a solution is the way that business gets done. Remember, results speak louder than any word or suggestion you can mutter and they position you to advance your organization.

Now I want to hear from you, what’s your two cents? While you may not be an employee anymore, how can you take initiative in your own business to demonstrate that you’re ready for more? After all, when you position yourself accordingly, more always shows up. Share you two cents by participating in our show after party right here on the blog…

©2013 by Darnyelle A. Jervey. All Rights Reserved. Darnyelle A. Jervey, MBA, The Incredible Factor Speaker, Business Coach and Marketing Mentor, is the founder of Incredible One Enterprises.com, Incredible Factor University® and the Leverage Your Incredible Factor System®, a proven step-by-step program for more clients, more income and more leverage in your business. For more information and a FREE audio CD “7 Critical Mistakes Entrepreneurs Must Avoid When Unleashing Your Incredible Factor So You Attract More Clients, Make More Money and Gain More Leverage” just fill out the form below.

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